Nine Network Can Show and Prove

Amy Shaw and the team at the Nine Network in St. Louis have posted a very cool video on community engagement.

Scene 1: A man, much in the vein of Ben Stein’s infamous economics teacher scene in “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” drones on about ratios of public participation to community involvement as he taps the projected image of a PowerPoint slide with a ruler. Cut to…

Scene 2: Nine Network staff getting out of the office, convening conversations and listening to diverse voices in their local community.

Followed by…

Scene 3: Amy Shaw and President & CEO Jack Galmiche discussing how they understand the role that the station plays in their local community, and how they can work with other community institutions to strengthen the civic health of St. Louis and it’s citizens.

Hats off to the Nine Network; they sure know how to show and prove.

 

POV Awards Grants for ‘Most Dangerous Man’

American Documentary | POV has awarded seven grants totaling $50,000 to public television stations to support local programming and community activities around the Oscar®-nominated film The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers. The grants are part of the second phase of POV’s national campaign to engage communities in dialogues about issues the film addresses. Funding for the campaign is provided by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

KNME – Albuquerque, N.M.
KNME will collaborate with the University of New Mexico and Albuquerque Public Schools. The station will broadcast a panel discussion on ethics and freedom of the press, and promote the documentary’s April broadcast on the public affairs program New Mexico in Focus. Host Gene Grant will interview Daniel Ellsberg via satellite uplink from KQED, using questions submitted by University of New Mexico Ethics in Journalism students and History of Media students, who will be in the audience. A panel of working journalists will discuss the issues.

KQED – San Francisco, Calif.
KQED is partnering with University of California Berkeley’s Boalt Hall School of Law and the Northern California chapter of the ACLU to hold an afternoon of discussion and debate about WikiLeaks, the legacy of the Pentagon Papers, national security, personal freedom and the rule of law. Ellsberg will talk about these issues on a panel that will also include university professors, government officials, reporters and other experts from across the country. The Most Dangerous Man in America also will be screened as part of the event.

Maryland Public Television – Owings Mills, Md.
MPT will engage journalism students at the University of Maryland’s Philip Merril College of Journalism with a screening and panel discussion on the station’s Direct Connection program. Audience members will participate in a live “Tweetup” with a hashtag to track the discussion. Prior to the event, the dean of the college will assign related projects to students.

WFYI – Indianapolis, Ind.
WFYI, along with the Pulliam School of Journalism at Franklin College, will host a community screening and discussion focusing on issues of transparency and freedom of information; Ellsberg will Skype into the event. WFYI will also reach Central Indiana listeners through the production of an episode of the local public affairs radio show No Limits.

WGVU – Grand Rapids, Mich.
WGVU is partnering with the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies at Grand Valley State University, Thomas M. Cooley Law School, journalism and political science classes at Grand Valley State University, and the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum, where a public screening and panel discussion will be held. Ellsberg will participate via Skype, and the event will serve as a “Tweetup” for some of the attendees. WGVU will also produce special editions of its local public affairs television program, Newsmakers, and radio call-in show, the WGVU Morning Show.

WVIZ – Cleveland, Ohio
WVIZ has forged a partnership with Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland State, as well as five local libraries and the Lakewood Public School District, to present a screening and panel discussion. The event will be accessible to viewers across the nation through real-time videoconferencing, posted on the WVIZ/PBS ideastream® website.

WXXI – Rochester, N.Y.
WXXI will collaborate with New York State universities Geneseo and Brockport, along with Rochester-area colleges, to hold a public screening followed by a Q&A with one of the film’s directors in-person, and Ellsberg via Skype. WXXI will also broadcast a radio interview with Ellsberg and use the encore broadcast of The Most Dangerous Man in America for its spring pledge drive.

Questions about the grant program? Contact Eliza Licht at POV.

 

Q&A with WQXR’s Terrance McKnight

While attending the Association of Music Personnel in Public Radio conference in New York, NCME took advantage of nabbing a few minutes with Terrance McKnight, host of WQXR’s All Ears.

Having on-air talent interacting and listening to people in real space in real time is an important part of WQXR’s strategy to develop new audiences for its classical music serv ice. McKnight has a reputation for being particularly engaged in the communities WQXR serves—especially Harlem, where he lives.

In the following Q&A, McKnight describes why community engagement is an essential part of his work and explains how WQXR is a cultural convener in New York City through its Battle of the Boroughs music competition.

Is it important for hosts to be visible in the communities their stations serve?

It’s part of living in the neighborhood [Harlem]. I didn’t just want to explore it from a book. But it’s also about getting out and seeing the voices that don’t listen to us—it’s critical. There are so many media choices. But when you put a face on it, it’s different. I expose people to something they don’t think they have access to or know about. I see myself as connective tissue between the station and the community. It’s a two-way process.

Has the two-way interactions informed your work on-the-air?

Absolutely.  I did a piece on Hazel Scott [wife of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. who was a music prodigy and Harlem Renaissance contributor]. No one knows about this woman. Her story needed telling. A way for me to serve the community is to bring out the highlights of the Harlem Renaissance. And she broke so much ground. To a young person [who doesn’t know she is], it shows “I can do something different.”

Why is classical music still relevant?

Because human emotions don’t change. And the music they wrote—Bach, Mozart, Beethoven—speaks to that. When you listen to it, it crosses centuries and cultures. 

How do you show people classical music is still relevant?

We do Battle of the Boroughs [a band competition]. The beauty of it, it doesn’t feel like a competition. Many of them know about each other, but never talk to each other.

So you’re able to act as a cultural convener?

Yeah. Like a guy who played in Battle of the Boroughs emailed me and said, “I need a violin player—the one who was from the Battle of the Boroughs.” And I can connect them. And by connecting musicians with each other, we hope the music will grow. We’re able to create a different experience of music where nobody feels like an outsider. It’s inclusive.

 

Resources from NPT’s “Next Door Neighbors” Webinar

The face of the nation is changing dramatically as new immigrants and unique cultures combine to create a more diverse America. Public media can play a vital role in bringing diverse neighbors together and building trust and understanding in local communities.

On March 16 we presented a webinar that explored Nashville Public Television’s (NPT) Next Door Neighbors project—an innovative model for engagement that uses documentary film and sustained community relationships to strengthen Nashville’s civic health.

We were joined by:

 

Kevin Crane, vice president of content and technology at NPT

 

John Creighton, a member of The Harwood Institute for Public Innovation’s national faculty;

 

 

Remziya Suleyman, policy coordinator at the Tennessee Immigrant & Refugee Rights Coalition.

 

 

If you missed the presentation, you may view the archive. Or, just review the PowerPoint slides.

You can learn more about Next Door Neighbors by watching this short clip, or visiting the project’s website.